A failure a day…

For over a month now, I’ve published a blog post almost every single day. When I started upping the frequency of my posts, I watched as the small number of subscribers and readers I had began to shrink to an even smaller number. With each post, a few more people would unsubscribe, and it would feel like rejection. The “0 people are viewing the site right now” message from Google Analytics would stare back at me in a mocking tone with every post, and it felt very much like failure.

Of course, I’m not a failure. This blog’s subscriber count may be small, but I’m incredibly grateful to the few of you that do read my posts (I see you there! What’s up?). I may not have tons of traffic, but that gives me an opportunity to hone my craft without the pressure of massive publicity.

There is no such thing as failure, just results and opportunity.

Each day I manage to hit publish, it’s a result, regardless of what happens after that. If I hit publish, I’ve overcome resistance, and proven to myself that feeling like a failure doesn’t change my ability to ship something. Even on those days I haven’t managed to get a post out the door, I still have an opportunity to experience the feeling of failure—and either way, it serves to remind me that it’s all in my head.

Whatever it is we’re doing, the feeling of failure never leaves us. The doubt we feel about the feedback we receive, the nausea we feel behind the curtain and in the wings, the pre-race overwhelm—even the best in the world still deal with exactly these feelings.

With repeated exposure to this feeling though, what happens is that we slowly inoculate ourselves against the fear of feeling like a failure. That’s why it’s so important to find yourself a way to practice—some kind of daily meditation that lets you confront the pesky voice of resistance inside our head that tells us we can’t do it.

Meditate on failure. Observe the results. Repeat.

Read this next:

Remote Jobseeker’s Handbook, by Coby Chapple (@cobyism)

Looking for a remote job, but don’t know where to start? I wrote the Remote Jobseeker’s Handbook precisely for you.